Fanuc 6M

The following MasterTask lesson outline indicates the tasks needed to act as a CNC Machining Center and CNC Mill operator and set up operator on Fanuc 6M controlled machinery. Because of the performance-based approach to training utilized within MasterTask systems, the outline below indicates what a trainee will be able to DO after completing each part of a lesson. Some of these tasks require the trainee to explain how something works to insure they have the required understanding of the processes and are not simply memorizing procedures. All of the tasks listed will be a part of the Performance Test within each lesson. To learn more about these tests and the training process itself, see the Philosophy section.

Lesson 1: Basic Machine Components and CNC Definitions [ Top ]

After completing this lesson the operator will be able to:

  1. Locate, identify, and explain the purpose of the basic components of a CNC machining center.
  2. Identify and name the three axes of movement of the machining center.
  3. Locate and identify information in part programs, including addresses, data, coordinates, sequence blocks, block numbers, and machining commands.
  4. Identify the plus and minus direction of each axis of movement.
  5. Explain how the directions of movement of the machine table are viewed by the CNC control.
  6. Power up the machine and inspect all operating systems such as hydraulics, coolant, lubrication and compressed air.
  7. Locate, identify and explain the purpose of the major operator controls.
  8. Manually move the machine to the Home position.
  9. Unclamp and remove a machined workpiece, and install a new workpiece.
  10. Reset the part program and restart automatic machining.
  11. Properly stop the machine in both emergency and non-emergency situations.

Lesson 2: The X and Y Coordinate Grid [ Top ]

After completing this lesson the operator will be able to:

  1. Explain the X and Y coordinate grid system and Part Program Zero, and identify the four quadrants of the grid.
  2. Locate, identify, and explain the purpose of the machine Handle and related controls.
  3. Display the Relative Position screen and zero the coordinates using the Origin operation.
  4. Manually move the machine to specific locations.
  5. Identify and explain the purpose for initialization commands in the part program, including inch/metric and absolute/incremental initialization.
  6. Calculate changes in coordinates using signed numbers.
  7. Identify Part Program Zero for the Z axis and explain the purpose of Tool Length Compensation.
  8. Identify and explain the purpose of Tool Length Compensation commands in the program.
  9. Calculate a new offset value and enter into the proper Offset Register in the Control.
  10. Load a program into the memory of the Control from punched tape.

Lesson 3: Basic Machine Setup [ Top ]

After completing this lesson the operator will be able to:

  1. Display the Program Directory screen on the CRT.
  2. Call up a part program which is stored in memory.
  3. Erase part programs from the Control's memory.
  4. Properly locate all spacers, angle plates and fixtures on the table according to the setup documentation.
  5. Determine the allowed tool clearance by inspection of the part program.
  6. Manually operate the Automatic Tool Changer.
  7. Inspect and install the tools for a setup into the drum or magazine.
  8. Install a dial indicator into the spindle; use the indicator to dial in the program zero hole on the fixture.
  9. Edit the X and Y program zero coordinates into the G92 blocks in the part program.
  10. Zero the tool offsets register.
  11. Load a tool from the tool changer into the spindle using MDI.
  12. Determine the tool offset value for each tool and enter these values into the offsets register.

Lesson 4: Reading Program Manuscripts [ Top ]

After completing this lesson the operator will be able to:

  1. Identify and explain the sequence of the major elements in part programs, including initialization, tool changes, cutting commands, and end of program.
  2. Identify and describe the purpose of specific program codes and commands, including tool commands, spindle speed commands, and M and G codes.
  3. Perform a program Search to locate a specific sequence block or command word.
  4. Identify and explain the operation of modal commands and non-modal commands.
  5. Identify and explain the purpose of status messages on the CRT: BUF, ABS, INC, ALM.
  6. Erase the CRT display when not needed to avoid damage to the monitor.
  7. Describe the tool path which will occur when a G28 or G29 command is programmed.
  8. Identify and explain the purpose of M codes, P addresses and L addresses used to call up sub-programs and program loops.
  9. Describe the sequence of events during sub-program call outs and during program looping.
  10. Identify and explain the purpose of program commands used for work coordinate offsets.
  11. Describe the function of work coordinate offsets to establish the location of multiple fixtures.
  12. Display the work coordinate offsets and enter new work coordinate offset values.

Lesson 5: Dry Running and Program Editing [ Top ]

After completing this lesson the operator will be able to:

  1. Identify and describe the purpose of operator switches and program commands used to control the part program during Dry Run.
  2. Set all operator switches and override controls to perform a Dry Run.
  3. Perform a Dry Run; monitor the machine movement during the Dry Run to prevent a crash.
  4. Describe the tool path which results from a programmed G00 command.
  5. Describe the tool path which results from a programmed G01 command.
  6. Describe the effect of Simultaneous Three Axis Interpolation on G00 and G01 tool paths.
  7. Perform Alter editing to change part program information.
  8. Add single command words and entire sequence blocks to a part program using Insert editing.
  9. Erase single words and entire sequence blocks using Delete editing.
  10. Reset the initialization codes and restart the Dry Run sequence after editing a tool path.

Lesson 6: Running the First Workpiece [ Top ]

After completing this lesson the operator will be able to:

  1. Install a workpiece and set all operator switches and override controls in preparation for machining the first workpiece.
  2. Reset the part program and machine the first workpiece, monitoring the machine movements.
  3. Properly adjust all coolant lines while machining the first workpiece.
  4. Identify the sound of chatter during machining and identify chatter marks on a workpiece.
  5. Explain the most common causes of chatter and the corrective action for each cause.
  6. Monitor the Active Load meter to check for overload on the spindle and on the Z axis feed.
  7. Determine the active spindle speed by reading the Spindle R.P.M. meter.
  8. Calculate a new feedrate or spindle speed after using an override control to correct a machining problem.
  9. Correctly adjust an adjustable boring bar to correct a machined dimension.
  10. Identify and explain the purpose of program commands used for Cutter Radius Compensation.
  11. Input an initial value into the offset register before using cutter radius compensation.
  12. Calculate the proper cutter radius compensation values based on the machined dimensions, and input into the offset register.

Lesson 7: Editing Circular Commands [ Top ]

After completion of this lesson, the operator will be able to:

  1. Identify and explain the function of the G codes which are used to establish each of the three possible 2-axis grid planes.
  2. Identify and explain the function of the G codes which establish the direction of circular cut rotation; describe the resulting tool path for each of the three grid planes.
  3. Identify and explain the programming of the end point for circular cutting.
  4. Identify and explain programming used to establish an arc center, and describe the addresses used to program the center point.
  5. Identify and explain the programming address and data used to program an arc radius; describe when radius programming may be used.
  6. Identify the programmed feedrate in a circular interpolation block.
  7. Describe the circumstances when an R address value can be edited to correct an arc, and when the D address offset must be altered.
  8. Explain the tool path and programming used to machine a complete circle feature, such as a recessed keyway.
  9. Measure a complete circle feature and edit the offset or program to produce a feature within tolerance.

Lesson 8: Milling and Solving Common Emergencies [ Top ]

After completing this lesson the operator will be able to:

  1. Identify common types of milling cutters, and explain the characteristics and application of each type.
  2. Identify the rake angle and relief angle on milling cutters, and explain the purpose of each angle.
  3. Identify worn and damaged milling cutters, including blue or burned edges, nicked or chipped edges, material buildup, and out-of-round cutters; describe the cause of each characteristic.
  4. Check a milling cutter for being out-of-round using a dial indicator.
  5. Properly install a straight shank type milling cutter and a bolt-on milling cutter in the tool holder.
  6. Safely stop the machine when a tool breaks and remove the tool.
  7. Install a chuck type tool, a collet type tool, a tap, a reamer and a boring bar into the tool holder.
  8. Check the size and length of newly installed tools, and reset the tool offsets to match the new length.
  9. Properly unstack "piggybacked" tools.
  10. Unstick the ATC Changer Arm.
  11. Return the table after overrunning a limit switch.
  12. Identify and explain the purpose of program commands used to establish the Stored Stroke Limit zone.
  13. Manually move the machine through the Stored Stroke Limit zone.

Lesson 9: Drills, Reamers, and Canned Cycles [ Top ]

After completing this lesson the operator will be able to:

  1. Identify all commonly used types of drills, explain the characteristics of each - for example, point angle - and describe the uses of each type.
  2. Identify reamers and explain their physical characteristics and uses.
  3. Identify a G81 drilling sequence in a program.
  4. Describe a G81 tool path, including the rapid approach, Start Point, Z depth, R level, feedrate, and G98/G99 retraction.
  5. Calculate and edit new X and Y coordinates to correct a drilled hole which is located incorrectly.
  6. Calculate and edit a new Z coordinate to correct the depth of a drilled hole.
  7. Identify and describe the purpose of the P address dwell in the G82 canned cycle and explain how the data is programmed.
  8. Explain the purpose of the Q address peck distance, and describe how the data is programmed.
  9. Edit the Q address data to correct problems with chips not clearing the drilled hole.
  10. Inspect drilled and reamed holes, identify the most common problems and correct any problems found.
  11. Inspect drills and reamers, identify the most common tooling problems and perform the appropriate corrective action.

Lesson 10: Tapping [ Top ]

After completing this lesson the operator will be able to:

  1. Identify taps, including gun plug, bottom, spiral flute, and gun flute taps, and explain their physical characteristics and uses.
  2. Inspect the thread notation on an inch or metric tap and determine its correctness for a setup.
  3. Properly install a tap in a floating holder.
  4. Describe a G84 right-hand tapping tool path, including the initial positioning, the rapid approach, start point, Z depth, R level, feedrate, rotation change before retraction, and G98/G99 retraction level.
  5. Describe a G74 left-hand tapping tool path.
  6. Inspect tapped holes for damaged threads, poor surface finish, flat crested threads, and describe the corrective action for each problem.
  7. Describe the relationship between the size of the tap-drill hole and the size of the tap, and describe the result if the hole is oversize or undersize.
  8. Calculate the proper feed and speed for a tapping operation based on the thread lead.
  9. Describe the purpose of the L address when programmed to repeat canned cycles and explain the effect of absolute and incremental programming.
  10. Edit a canned cycle with an L address to obtain smoother surface finish.

Lesson 11: Boring Bars [ Top ]

After completing this lesson the operator will be able to:

  1. Identify types of solid boring bars and boring bars with replaceable inserts.
  2. Identify and explain the purpose of the cutting and relief angles on a boring bar insert, and describe the proper angle of the cutting angles.
  3. Set the grinding angles on a grinder, and grind a boring bar to produce the proper cutting angles.
  4. Install an adjustable boring head in a tool holder, and install the boring bar in the head.
  5. Use a setting gauge to set boring bars to the proper initial diameter before installation.
  6. Describe a G76 fine boring tool path, including the initial positioning, the rapid approach, X and Y start point, Z depth, R level, Q retraction distance, feedrate, and G98/G99 retraction level.
  7. Describe a G85 two-pass boring tool path, including the second boring pass as the tool retracts.
  8. Describe a G86 rough boring tool path.
  9. Describe a G89 flat bottom boring tool path, including the dwell programmed with the P address.
  10. Describe a G87 back boring tool path, including the off-center initial positioning, approach to the R level at the bottom of the hole, the Q move-in distance, back boring to the Z axis end point, and retraction to the initial point along Z.